Just the facts on religion.

Hindu Rituals & Practices

The religious life of many Hindus is focused on devotion to God (perceived as Brahman, Shiva, Vishnu, or Shakti) or several gods. This devotion usually takes the form of rituals and practices associated with sculptures and images of gods in home shrines.

More philosophically-minded Hindus ignore the gods altogether and seek Realization of the Self through intense meditation. Still others focus primarily on fulfilling the social and moral duties appropriate to their position in life.

These various approaches are regarded as equally valid, and in fact are formally recognized as three paths (margas) to liberation: bhaktimarga (the path of devotion), jnanamarga (the path of knowledge or philosophy), and karmamarga (the path of works and action).

Hindu religious stages

Hindu religious practices center on the importance of fulfilling the duties associated both with one's social position and one's stage of life. With regard to the latter, traditional Hindus are expected to pass through four stages (ashramas) over the course of their life:

    - Brahmacharga, which takes place during the school years, is focused on acquiring knowledge and developing character; - Grastha, the middle years, is focused on worldly pursuits and pleasures such as marriage, family and career; - Vanaprastha, when one's children reach adulthood, is a time of increased focus on spiritual things; and - Sanngasu, in the last years of life, one may abandon the world entirely for a life of contemplation.
  • Ayurveda

    Ayurveda (आयुर्वेद Sanskrit: ayu—life; veda—knowledge of) is a comprehensive system of healing that is more than 5,000 years old and based on a holistic approach rooted in Vedic culture... full article →
  • Hatha Yoga

    ## What is Hatha Yoga? Outside of the culture of Hinduism, the word "yoga" is usually understood to refer to the practice of meditative movement and bodily postures... full article →
  • Hindu cow taboo

    ## Why is the cow important to Hindus? In Hinduism, the cow is revered as the source of food and symbol of life and may never be killed. However, many non-Hindus interpret these beliefs to mean that Hindus worship cows... full article →
  • Hindu temple

    Ancient Indian thought divides time into four different periods. These durations are referred to as the Krta, Treta, Dvapara, and Kali. The first of these divisions (Krta), is also known as satya-yuga, or the Age of Truth... full article →
  • Kundalini Yoga

    In Hinduism, kundalini refers to the psychic or cosmic energy that lies dormant in most people. It is sometimes identified with Shakti, the Great Goddess who is equated with divine energy... full article →
  • Namaste

    ## What does Namaste mean? In Hinduism, Namaste is a common spoken valediction or salutation originating in the Indian subcontinent. It is a customary greeting when individuals meet, and a valediction upon their parting... full article →
  • sadhu

    One way of life in Hinduism is renunciation of the world and asceticism, which is the path of the sadhu or Hindu holy man. The term sadhu comes from the Sanskrit for "accomplish" and can refer to any religious ascetic or holy man... full article →
  • Worship

    ## What is Puja? In Hinduism, Puja (alternative spelling pooja; Sanskrit: "reverence" or "worship") is a religious ritual which most Hindus perform every morning after bathing and dressing but prior to taking any food or drink... full article →

Article Info

Title Hindu Rituals & Practices
URL www.religionfacts.com/hinduism/practices
Short URLrlft.co/818
Published
UpdatedNovember 18, 2016
MLA Citation“Hindu Rituals & Practices.” ReligionFacts.com. 18 Nov. 2016. Web. Accessed 5 Dec. 2016. <www.religionfacts.com/hinduism/practices>

Share This Page