Christianity
Topics

Introduction Beliefs Comparison Charts Denominations Facts History Holidays Overview Biographies Practices and Rituals Symbols Texts Timeline Items and Things

New and Featured in Christianity Section

What were the 10 Plagues of the Exodus?

What are the Seven Deadly Sins?

New and Featured On Religion Facts

Compare Sunni and Shia Muslims

Jehovah's Witnesses and Mormonism Comparison Chart

Religion Facts offers

downloadable charts



Christian books

New Release


The Great Reformer

by Austen Ivereigh


New Release

40 Questions about the Historical Jesus

by Marvin Pate


Best seller

Jesus on Trial

by David Limbaugh


New Release

New Rules for Love, Sex, and Dating

by Andy Stanley




New Release


by Ruth Soukup


Article Info:
published: 3/31/13
updated: 2/27/14

Job



Who was Job?

In the Hebrew Bible or Christian Old Testament, Job is the main character of the book of Job, who is described as a wealthy and holy land-owner during patriarchal times that suffered tremendous harship in life.

The titular hero of the Book of Job, represented as a wealthy and pious land-holder who lived in patriarchal times, or at least conditions, in the land of Uz, on the borders of Idumea. Outside of the Book of Job he is mentioned by Ezekiel (Ezekiel 14:14) as one of 3 great personages whose representative righteousness would presumably avail, if that of any individuals could, to redeem the nation; the other two being Noah, an ancient patriarch, and Daniel, a contemporary of the prophet.

It is difficult to determine whether Job was an actual personage or not. If known through legend, it must have been on account of some such experience as is narrated in the book, an experience unique enough to have become a potent household word; still, the power and influence of it is due to the masterly vigor and exposition of the story. It was the Job of literature, rather than the Job of legend, who lived in the hearts of men; a character so commanding that, albeit fictitious, it could be referred to as real, just as we refer to Hamlet or Othello.


It is not the way of Hebrew writers, however, to evolve literary heroes from pure imagination; they crave an authentic basis of fact. It is probable that such a basis, in its essential outlines, existed under the story of Job. It is not necessary to suppose, however, that the legend or the name was known to Israel from ancient times. Job is introduced (Job 1:1) as if he had not been known before. The writer, who throughout the book shows a wide acquaintance with the world, doubtless found the legend somewhere, and drew its meanings together for an undying message to his and all times.

Recommended for You


More on Christianity


World Religions - Main pages


Christian beliefs

Christian denominations

Christian facts

Christian history

Christian holidays

Christian biographies

Christian practices

Christian symbols

 

Buddhism

Christianity

Confucianism

Hinduism

Islam

Jehovah's Witnesses

Judaism

Mormonism



Source

IBSE, (in the public domain) with minor edits.



© 2004-2015 ReligionFacts. All rights reserved. | About Us | How to Cite | Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Advertising Info
Site created with Dreamweaver. Web hosting by Blue Host. Menu powered by Milonic.
Religions: Religion Comparison Chart | Bahá'í | Buddhism | Chinese Religion | Christianity | Confucianism | Hinduism | Islam | Jehovah's Witnesses | Judaism | Mormonism | Rastafarianism | Scientology | Shinto | Taoism
Features: Big Religion Chart | Religions A-Z | Religious Symbols Gallery
ReligionFacts provides free, objective information on religion, world religions, comparative religion and religious topics.