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Article Info
published: 3/31/13

Nain in the Bible



Nain in the New Testament

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Nain is a town mentioned in Scripture only in connection with the visit of Jesus and the miracle of raising the widow's son from the dead (Lk 7:11). The name persists to this day, and in the form of Nein clings to a small village on the northwestern slope of Heb: Jebel ed-Duchy ("Hill of Moreh"), the mountain which, since the Middle Ages, has been known as Little Hermon.

The modern name of the mountain is derived from Heb: Neby Duchy whose wely crowns the height above the village. There are many ancient remains, proving that the place was once of considerable size. It was never enclosed by a wall, as some have thought from the mention of "the gate."


This was probably the opening between the houses by which the road entered the town. Tristram thought he had found traces of an ancient city wall, but this proved to be incorrect. The ancient town perhaps stood somewhat higher on the hill than the present village. In the rocks to the East are many tombs of antiquity.

The site commands a beautiful and extensive view across the plain to Carmel, over the Nazareth hills, and away past Tabor to where the white peak of Hermon glistens in the sun.

To the South are the heights of Gilboa and the uplands of Samaria. The village, once prosperous, has fallen on evil days.

It is said that the villagers received such good prices for simsum that they cultivated it on a large scale. A sudden drop in the price brought them to ruin, from which, after many years, they have not yet fully recovered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Source:

International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, which is in the public domain (with minor edits).